Marine Movies

Snorkeling at Sandycove, Dublin

Collecting samples for imaging back in the studio whilst enjoying the feeling of weightlessness as you relax all your muscles and lay face down, motionless, bobbing up and down on the waves looking at the colourful kaleidoscopic patterns of the waves projected onto the bedrock of the sea floor, the sea weeds swaying in the flow and listening to the sounds of the sea. Surreal!!

Blue Rayed Limpet

Blue-rayed limpets (Helcion pellucidum) measure about 3mm across and live on kelp plants. I first noticed these when snorkeling off the beach in Derrynane when in the sunshine, you can see their iridescent blue stripes glint at certain angles of incidence. This is due to diffraction of the white sunlight off the tiny structures (or spacing between them) that make up the bands on their shell whose size would be on the order of the wavelength of blue light about 400 nanometers across. We can also see the grain structure in the shell by the different colours in cross-polarised light.

Bristleworm

4mm in length, this Bristleworm (Ragworm) was imaged in dark field compensated polarised light.

Comb Jelly

The Comb Jelly or Sea Gooseberry from the phyla Ctenophore is a transparent sphere with eight rows of comb-like plates of fused cilia. Primarily used for locomotion, the cilia beat in synchronised motion seen as travelling waves. Best seen against the black abyss when diving during the night, the fantastic rainbow light show is caused by light diffraction off the cilia plates as they beat. The creature has no brain but does have a nervous system called a neural net with transducers for sensing the environment and orientation. Some of its internal wiring can be seen in the clips. Unlike jellyfish, it's tentacles are sticky rather than stinging in order to catch plankton.

Cushion Star (Asterina phylactica)

The Comb Jelly or Sea Gooseberry from the phyla Ctenophore is a transparent sphere with eight rows of comb-like plates of fused cilia. Primarily used for locomotion, the cilia beat in synchronised motion seen as travelling waves. Best seen against the black abyss when diving during the night, the fantastic rainbow light show is caused by light diffraction off the cilia plates as they beat. The creature has no brain but does have a nervous system called a neural net with transducers for sensing the environment and orientation. Some of its internal wiring can be seen in the clips. Unlike jellyfish, it's tentacles are sticky rather than stinging in order to catch plankton.

Creatures from the Rockpool

Clip 1. There are two types of Bristleworm - a fan worm and a segmented Ragworm worm. The first clip shows the Ragworm, this specimen measuring about 3mm in length.

Clip 2. Sea Louse

Clip 3. Amphipod

Clip 4. Fan worms